When Strangers Marry

When Strangers Marry

You go along for years batting your brains out for fifty dollars a week. And that fifty dollars seems like, well, just about the most important thing in the world to you. And then suddenly you meet a guy that carries… Ten thousand dollars, Millie. Ten thousand dollars. And there it was lying on the floor right in front of me… It didn’t seem right that a man like that should have all that money.

At last I see this charmingly moody 1944 noir, written about in depth by Frank Krutnik. From legendary director William Castle, later known for his persistent gimmickry, comes what is held as one of the best B-films made. Indeed, the movie’s solid performances, story and visual aesthetic transcend this context considerably.

The premise is divine – a newlywed young woman rides a train to met her husband whom she barely knows and whom, it turns out, is suspect for murder. The result is a suspenseful piece that packs emotion and some delicious surprises. Though somewhat short at 67 minutes, When Strangers Marry carries all the fascination of noir.